Helping America's Most Vulnerable

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Volunteers of America works to serve the greatest needs of the most vulnerable people in our community. As a valued supporter, we need your feedback as we continue to serve.

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Leave a Legacy

Making a Lasting Difference Today

The Ballington and Maud Booth Legacy Society gives you the opportunity to make a transformational gift today while maintaining your assets. Your gift will make an impact for years to come.

Your planned gift will provide stable funding for the future of Volunteers of America. It will ensure that Volunteers of America can continue to meet the ever-changing needs of society. Your legacy gift can be designated to be used at the President's discretion for our greatest needs.

Your Impact on on the Future 

The Ballington and Maud Booth Legacy Society will preserve and strengthen Volunteers of America in its mission.Through your gift to the Ballington and Maud Booth Legacy Society, we can create an important source of funding.Many lives have been touched through the vision of Legacy Society members.Their legacy can be felt today throughout Volunteers of America.By planning their charitable giving, they have helped restore hope and promise for the future. Your gift will make the same impact for years to come.

Like these visionaries, you can also impact the lives of those less fortunate. Please consider including Volunteers of America in your gift planning. You will help change lives and restore hope for future generations.

  • Jerry McCowan

    James Gagliano knew a thing or two about ice. Besides living through Colorado’s icy winters, Jim delivered ice for 35 years, mostly in downtown Denver. He delivered block ice, sack ice, and sculpture ice. He would start loading his truck about 3 o’clock in the morning and usually finished his route around 10 o’clock. Although only 5’4”, Jim could carry a 50 lb. block of ice. Jim had a long life which he attributed to exercise and good health, working out regularly. He swam at local recreation center pools and also walked five miles a day. All this boded well for Jim. He lived until age 95. After his death, we learned that he had made a bequest in his will to Volunteers of America. According to his executor, “Jim thought highly of your organization, had contributed to it in the past, and was hopeful you could help those in need”. We are truly grateful for his generosity and compassion in providing for future generations to give them the opportunity for a new life. Through his bequest to Volunteers of America, Jim continues to help change the lives of the most vulnerable.

  • Harvey Olmstead

    Business man, Harvey Olmstead, died more than a decade ago. To help the less fortunate, he bequeathed buildings he owned to Volunteers of America through a charitable remainder annuity trust. Today he helps feed, shelter and inspire the homeless. His buildings house the Mission, a day shelter and kitchen for the needy, Bannock Youth Center, a center guiding homeless youth toward financial responsibility and stable housing, and the new Veteran Service Center, a one-stop-shop for veteran families to find service and help. Without Mr. Olmstead’s foresight, we would not have had the means to help as many people as we do today.

  • Doris Ferguson

    Doris Ferguson lives on by ensuring that the elderly in Aurora, Colorado are receiving daily nutrition while living independently. Ferguson's gift continues to make it possible for seniors in her community receive meals on wheels. Without Meals on Wheels, many home-bound seniors in Aurora would not eat and may not see any visitors for weeks at a time. This gift means that seniors in Aurora receive the nutrients they need and see at least one smiling face at their door each week, their Meals on Wheels volunteers.

We welcome your questions and support. Please contact Joan Blick, Major and Planned Giving Manager, at
Phone: (720) 264-3329
jblick@voacolorado.org